Month: April 2016

Honestly, I Love The Prequels

star wars prequels.jpg

Photo source: thenerdpocalypse.com

I’m a huge Star Wars fan, and also a film major. So what I am about to say may sound almost like treason, but I honestly love the Star Wars prequel trilogy. Although I agree that the films are not great, I enjoy them.

As a child of the ’90’s and early 2000’s, I grew up when the prequels were released. The Phantom Menace, which is the lowest reviewed film of the entire series, was the first Star Wars film that I saw. I was six years old and fell in love with the series. I loved the podracing, the epic lightsaber duel with Darth Maul, and the entire film in general. It was fun. Yes, I recently watched the film and agree that it has a lot of story issues, but it is certainly fun to watch, with all of the action and mythology. Attack of the Clones and Revenge of the Sith have a similar place in my heart; I have fond memories of seeing them in theaters and immediately wanting to buy a lightsaber and action figure afterwards.

Many will argue that the prequel trilogy’s stories were not told well. As a screenwriting major, I don’t disagree. However, I believe that the prequels’ overall story of hero Anakin Skywalker turning to the dark side and becoming Darth Vader was a good story. To summarize, he was a pitiable slave turned hero who turned to the dark side to save his true love. Overall, that’s a compelling story. I also believe that Revenge of the Sith was well-written; it wasn’t perfect, but Anakin’s transformation did emotionally move me and there were moments when I wanted to cry during the film. Yes, I do believe that details and storylines of the prequel trilogy could be improved, but I thought Anakin’s story was decent at the very least.

Finally, the prequels did have their highlights. Without them, we wouldn’t have the Sith great that is Darth Maul, the Boba Fett origin story, or the epic lightsaber battles between Yoda and Darth Sidious and Anakin vs. Obi-Wan. Even though the original trilogy’s story was better than the prequels, the prequels were still a spectacle to watch. They expanded the Star Wars universe with beautiful planets and worlds like Naboo and added interesting characters like Qui-Gon Jinn and Jango Fett. And now that I’ve finished re-watching the films for the millionth time, I want to watch them again and experience the cinematic magic once more.

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The “Favorite Movie of All-Time” Question

As a film major and aspiring writer, I have often been asked the question, “What is your favorite movie of all-time?” Honestly, the answer doesn’t come to me right away. I’ve answered with several different responses over the years. I have a few favorites, namely Scream, Clueless, The Lion King, Spider-Man, and American Pie. There are even a few more that I could argue are my favorites.

I remember when I was asked the question at a freshmen preview for Loyola Marymount University (although I later ended up attending Chapman University). I responded with “Scream” and half of the kids in my group laughed at me. They chose much more typical film student movies, like “Requiem for a Dream” or “The Godfather” or every other typical movie a film students claims is their favorite in order to sound sophisticated.

We all have that movie that we are shamefully in love and afraid to admit it. In my case, I wasn’t afraid to admit it. Still, I think our favorite movies should be the ones that mean something more to us. I loved Scream for years because it inspired me to want to write scripts that are smart and witty, innovative, and have admirable characters. I’ve recently grown to love Legally Blonde because Elle Woods inspires me to believe in myself, even when I’ve hit a rough patch in my life.

So, to conclude, I encourage all film majors and fans to never feel pressure by the question they will probably be asked by producers, writers, directors, studio executives, professors, and anyone else involved with film. Also, the kid who says Heathers is their favorite movie of all-time is going to stand out a lot more than the one who says with the standard Godfather or Citizen Kane.